Day 13

Urban Ecology

PARTNERS

Guayaki
The Story of Stuff Project

OVERVIEW

Trees are not just scenery. They’re critical infrastructure for the health and wealth and well-being of communities. Distributing the cooling shade of trees more equitably across our cities is an absolutely essential strategy. We like to say that hashtag tree equity equals hashtag health equity.”
Jad Daley, President, American Forests

Cities: bustling havens full of tall buildings, busy people, and heavy traffic. They are hubs of new ideas and technologies, and the places where culture constantly grows and thrives.

What is something that most cities lack? Sufficient amounts of trees and greenery. With extensive quantities of concrete and a dearth of trees, neighborhoods within cities can easily become urban heat islands. These “heat islands” are marked by a lack of plant life and strong presence of dark cement, absorbing the sun’s heat and becoming lethally warm in the summers, which continue to grow hotter as Earth’s average temperature steadily rises. What’s more, these disproportionately occur in marginalized communities and communities of color. A look into history shows us that this is not incidental.

In the 1930s and 1940s, cities throughout the United States were divided to create racially segregated communities in line with Jim Crow laws. To force people of color into certain neighborhoods, maps of cities were drawn up, and the neighborhoods in which people of color were allowed to live were shaded in red, bringing about the term “redlining.” Banks would only give loans or sell mortgages to people of color who were purchasing homes in those designated zones. There were four different types of zones referenced throughout the redlining process: green, which meant “best;” blue, which represented “still desirable;” yellow, which stood for “definitely declining;” and red, which meant “hazardous.” To see what redlining looked like throughout California, check out this article with zoned maps of San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose, and Los Angeles. People of color and low income populations were relegated to purchasing homes and land in red and yellow zones, which were laden with sewage plants, polluting factories, contaminated water sources, and many more factors detrimental to environmental health. These neighborhoods, with an abundance of pollution and dangerous conditions, lacked the extensive green spaces and tree life of wealthier neighborhoods, a pattern that continues in historically redlined neighborhoods today.

Why is a limited number of trees in a neighborhood a problem? A study by Portland State University and Virginia Commonwealth University shows that historically redlined neighborhoods are hotter on average than neighborhoods listed as “desirable,” some by almost thirteen degrees, due to their lack of tree cover. Intense heat kills more Americans annually than any other natural event, and because redlined neighborhoods are disproportionately made up of people of color, this is an environmental justice issue, as well as a public health crisis.

Planting trees may seem like a simple solution to the issue of ecological inequity in urban environments, but gentrification goes hand in hand with creating more green space. By adding parks to an area with little to no green space, real estate prices within it rise, driving out the low-income residents and quickly gentrifying a neighborhood. How do we provide greenery for communities that need it, while not creating infrastructure that will ultimately drive them out of their homes? This balance will be a critical concept moving forward in urban ecology work.

Luckily, urban greening is not limited to the creation of parks. One way people have incorporated plants into neighborhoods is through community gardens, like the P-Patch program in Seattle, Washington. People can sign up to receive a plot in a communal garden space when it becomes available, and are able to use that space to grow whatever they would like. Recently, community gardens have become a big part of the movement to bring ecological justice to cities and residents who lack access to green space or the land needed to establish a garden. At the same time, community gardens address food justice, as providing land for people to grow fruits and vegetables increases access to fresh and organic food that some residents might otherwise not be able to afford.

It’s clear that the presence of trees throughout cities is a matter of equity and social justice, but working with existing infrastructures and systems of government can be a huge barrier to making change. Organizations such as the Baltimore Tree Trust are working to end tree inequity, planting trees throughout redlined neighborhoods and conversing with residents to learn their ecological needs and how the organization can most effectively address them. This grassroots work is critical to the success of urban greening efforts, as the people living in tree-scarce neighborhoods are the ones who can best speak to what those neighborhoods actually need. City officials must be involved as well, as they have the bureaucratic power to allow potential projects to move forward, but the voices of residents are equally important in the discussion and work. Our partner, Going Green Media, visited some of the greenest cities and greenest buildings to share solutions that are being developed around the world – and our partner, New Society Publishers, a leader in sustainable publishing, provides resources for urban architecture, urban landscaping, ecocities and promoting a sustainable future.

Urban ecology must be a main focus of the environmental justice movement, and the environmentalist community as a whole needs to recognize its significance in creating a greener and more just future for cities and the world.

CHALLENGE

Green

20 POINTS

THINK

Establishing parks takes extensive work by many parties and often involves a hefty financial investment. A great way to incorporate plants into life in the city is through simply having them growing in your home — or in some cases, on your home. Adding greenery indoors might seem daunting or challenging, but it doesn’t have to be!

 

CHALLENGE

Simply bringing more plants into your personal space — whether a dorm, apartment, house or offices — adds life and fresh air (with literal oxygen!) to the built urban environment.

If you could bring any plant into your home, what would it be? Scroll the endless #plantstagram world for inspiration, check out fun hashtags like #plantsmakemehappy, #plantmom, #houseplantclub, and peruse accounts that seek to un-whitewash these spaces and highlight diverse plant lovers like @plantkween, @blackmenwithgardens, @blackgirlswithgardens and many more.

Research one plant that could live in your climate, at least three health benefits for your personal environment, the reasons you love it, and where you may be able to realistically find it. Yard sales, Facebook Marketplace and even the sidewalk can yield free or low-cost gems, in addition to beloved local plant shops and organic nurseries!

Now regram a photo of your dream plant with a caption that includes the above information. Be sure to tag @TurningGreenOrg, the account you regram (or ones that led you there!), #PGC2021 and some stellar plant hashtags for good measure!

 

DELIVERABLES

Upload your reflection and a screenshot of your social media post. Please include your name (or team name), username and school.

Submission Guidelines

  • Submit all entries as PDFs; no Word or Pages documents
  • Be sure to include all content for your submission in one document
  • Save file names using the following format: firstname_lastname_challengeday_challengelevel_year.pdf (ex: kasie_shils_day1_greener_2020.pdf)
  • Do not include # or spaces in filenames
  • Do not upload a file larger than 5 MB
  • You will see a confirmation in green that your submission uploaded correctly; if you do not see this confirmation, please try again
  • If your total points does not change, your submission did not load correctly, please try again
  • Send any questions to info@turninggreen.org
  • Don’t forget to post about the challenge and your learnings/doings on social media and tag us on Instagram @TurningGreenOrg, Facebook @Turning Green, Twitter @TurningGreenOrg, and use #PGC2021 
The deadline for entering this challenge has past.

Greener

40 POINTS

THINK

How do we add parks and greenery to urban areas without pushing out the people who need it most? Recognizing the connection between more green space and gentrification is critical to combat inequity. Read this article by GRIST to learn about neighborhoods, segregation and trees.

 

CHALLENGE

Check out this article on finding balance between greening a neighborhood and preventing gentrification.

Now consider your neighborhood — either the one you grew up in or where you go to school. What does green space look like there? Take a 10 (or more!) minute walk around your neighborhood to observe green space and any evidence of gentrification, taking pictures or screenshots as you go. (If you can’t get outside, hop onto Google Maps street view for a virtual “stroll” and take screenshots.) Compile your pictures into a photo essay, accompanied by a short 3 sentence reflection on what you observed. Share your photo essay on Instagram, tagging @TurningGreenOrg and #PGC2021.

 

DELIVERABLES

Upload your photo essay, reflection and screenshot of your social media post as a PDF document. Please include your name (or team name), username and school. 

Submission Guidelines

  • Submit all entries as PDFs; no Word or Pages documents
  • Be sure to include all content for your submission in one document
  • Save file names using the following format: firstname_lastname_challengeday_challengelevel_year.pdf (ex: kasie_shils_day1_greener_2020.pdf)
  • Do not include # or spaces in filenames
  • Do not upload a file larger than 5 MB
  • You will see a confirmation in green that your submission uploaded correctly; if you do not see this confirmation, please try again
  • If your total points does not change, your submission did not load correctly, please try again
  • Send any questions to info@turninggreen.org
  • Don’t forget to post about the challenge and your learnings/doings on social media and tag us on Instagram @TurningGreenOrg, Facebook @Turning Green, Twitter @TurningGreenOrg, and use #PGC2021
The deadline for entering this challenge has past.

Greenest

60 POINTS

THINK

Who makes vital decisions around tree cover, green spaces, and city planning? Local governments greenlight projects and developments that affect residents. But residents play an equally important role in this process. YOU are the ones who need, use and benefit from parks and green spaces, and your voice must be heard.

 

CHALLENGE

In this challenge, you will take on the role of city planner for the locale you have chosen.

Begin by watching Steve Whitman’s TED Talk on “Shifting the World from Grey to Green.” Use this map to locate a historically redlined neighborhood in a city where you feel a personal connection (i.e. where you’re from, go to school, have family, etc.).

Research the current condition of the neighborhood through photos and Google Maps. Has it improved since it was designated as a redlined neighborhood? What does it lack in terms of green space and tree cover? Examine the layout of the neighborhood to determine where green space or trees would fit best and how you can most effectively incorporate more plant life into the community. Focus on utilizing species that are native to the region, as that will benefit local biodiversity and flora and fauna populations.

Craft a slideshow presentation (Google Slides, PowerPoint or Keynote) detailing a brief history of the neighborhood, the current conditions (temperatures, tree cover, etc.), comparisons to neighborhoods that were not redlined, and your plan for bringing more green space and plant life to the community. Make sure to include benefits of increasing tree cover for the residents, city, and property in order to “convince” the city to go through with your plan for the neighborhood.

Post it as a slider on Instagram with an informative caption to raise awareness about the issue. Tag @TurningGreenOrg and any relevant local government accounts, as well as #PGC2021. Challenge your friends to research and get involved too!

Bonus points are yours if you submit or email the presentation to a local representative or city government office AND get a response! Send us a copy of that communication to info@turninggreen.org by October 28.

 

DELIVERABLES 

Upload your presentation as a PDF document (simply save the slideshow in that format before uploading) and a screenshot of your social media post. Please include your name (or team name), username and school.

Submission Guidelines

  • Submit all entries as PDFs; no Word or Pages documents
  • Be sure to include all content for your submission in one document
  • Save file names using the following format: firstname_lastname_challengeday_challengelevel_year.pdf (ex: kasie_shils_day1_greenest_2021.pdf)
  • Do not include # or spaces in filenames
  • Do not upload a file larger than 5 MB
  • You will see a confirmation in green that your submission uploaded correctly; if you do not see this confirmation, please try again
  • If your total points does not change, your submission did not load correctly, please try again
  • Send any questions to info@turninggreen.org
  • Don’t forget to post about the challenge and your learnings/doings on social media and tag us on Instagram @TurningGreenOrg, Facebook @Turning Green, Twitter @TurningGreenOrg, and use #PGC2021

TODAY’S PRIZES

Up to 10 Greener and 10 Greenest outstanding submissions will be selected as winners.

Each Greener Winner Will Receive:

  • A copy of “Thriving Beyond Sustainability: Pathways to a Resilient Society” by Andrés R. Edwards with a foreword by Bill McKibben from our partner, New Society Publishers. This book draws a collective map of individuals, organizations and communities from around the world that are committed to building an alternative future-one that strives to restore ecological health, reinvent outmoded institutions and rejuvenate our environmental, social and economic systems.
  • A water-resistant, rechargeable and extendable/retractable LED tape light from Barebones Living, a B Corp that meets the highest verified standards of social and environmental performance, transparency, and accountability. 
  • A thermos from U-Konserve. As a Certified B Corporation and member of 1% for the Planet, U-Konserve is using business for good. The initial mission to protect the planet has grown into a lifestyle of reusing more, wasting less, and raising awareness to reduce single-use plastic.
  • A box of tea from Numi, a B Corp that produces Organic and Fair Trade certified teas from all over the world. Numi’s mission is to “to nurture and empower communities to thrive. We envision a world where all basic human needs are met and people have the resources to fulfill their greatest potential.” 

Each Greenest winner will receive:

  • The e-book of The Edible Ecosystem Solutions: Growing Biodiversity In Your Backyard and Beyond by Zach Loeks from our partner, New Society Publishers. This book is a comprehensive, practical guidebook that looks at underutilized spaces to reveal the many opportunities for landscape transformation that are both far-reaching and immediately beneficial and enjoyable. 
  • An organic canvas tote from Lo & Sons, an Asian-American owned family business that’s on a mission to inspire and empower people to go places, while leaving a positive impact on people’s lives and the planet.
  • An insulated stainless steel tumbler from U-Konserve. As a Certified B Corporation and member of 1% for the Planet, U-Konserve is using business for good. The initial mission to protect the planet has grown into a lifestyle of reusing more, wasting less, and raising awareness to reduce single-use plastic.